Eruvin 65 – עירובין סה


Click here to view text of Daf (can be minimized alongside player)

Play Audio Only    Download Audio    Download Video

Today’s Daf Yomi Question:

The Gemara extolls the virtues of daytime learning, contending that the nights were intended for sleep.  How does this reconcile with the Passuk of ‘Vehagisa bo yomam valayla’?

Download Audio

One thought on “Eruvin 65 – עירובין סה

  1. Tosafos says that the night being referred to here are the short nights of the summer.

    Besides, the Gemara tells us elsewhere that we are Mekayem that Pasuk even by saying Krias Shema. This shows us that the point of the Pasuk is that there should be Torah done by day and Torah done by night. It is not talking about the entire day and night. Even though that is the extreme lowest fulfillment of this Pasuk, and surely we are supposed to spend a lot of time learning, it shoes us that the main point is to have learned by day and learned by night.

    What would be more of a question is the Gemara in Chagiga that says, one who learns Torah at night will have a thread of favor before him by day. This seems to show us that learning is preferred at night.

    The Maharal in Nesiv Hatorah (Perek 4) quotes this Gemara, that the night was created for sleep, and uses this to explain why learning at night is preferred. At night is when the world is inactive. It is therefore the side of world that relates more to beyond our domain. A Talmid Chacham can utilize this special circumstance and tune in to this moment that transcends our area of focus when he learns Toras Hashem.

    Daytime learning has its benefits as well, as the Gemara here says of Rav Zeira, that his learning was sharp because it was daytime Torah. Daytime is our time. It is easier to be more involved by day, and the daytime learning has the appreciable light.

    [If we want to utilize both of these, it would make sense to learn at night that which is removed from the mundane and requires penetration, and to learn by day that which requires Kushyos and Terutzim, give and take, and practical applications.]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>